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Thu, Feb

The unusual kitchen heroes - Iboro Tonye-Edet

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The kitchen is everyone’s favourite room, well maybe not everyone but it’s no doubt the engine room of every home and also the main core of major messes. Most times, we rely on scouring powder to scrub grease off our pots or harmless pesticides to get rid of those creepy insects. Interestingly, there’s a whole world of other unusual cleaners and surprising refreshers just perfect for your kitchen which you probably never knew about but they stare at you right in the face every time you open your pantry or cabinets.

These items are not just money savers but what I like to call the Unusual Kitchen Heroes.

Ketchup (for pots/pans stains): Tackle tarnish on brass knobs or copper pot bottoms with ketchup. The acid in tomatoes works magic on those rough, discolored areas. Squirt some onto a cloth and buff, then rinse with plain water and dry. For baked-on grime on stainless steel pots and pans, apply ketchup with steel wool/sponge and a little elbow grease.

 

Bread (for broken glass): One of your tumblers slipped, oops! Now you’ve got a dangerous mess to clean. Though the broom may pick most visible pieces, there is an unlikely hero to help with the unseen pieces. Soft spongy bread to the rescue: Yes, you read right, bread. The bread works like a magnet to pick up even the smallest slivers of glass. Place a slice over the accident and press lightly, then discard immediately.

 

Chalk or talcum Powder (for Ants): Ants in your kitchen can be very annoying. You can send them packing by drawing a line with chalk or talcum powder at their point of entry. When ants cross over the chemical compound of calcium carbonate, it breaks the trail of pheromones they deposit, thereby causing their comrades to retreat.

 

Blend soapy water (for a clean blender): The blender is one of the simplest kitchen appliances to operate, but getting it spotless is another matter. The simple solution? After use, rinse out the jar, add dish soap and water, and place it back on the base. Turn on the blender and—swoosh!—goodbye to the muck that would otherwise cling to the bottom or blades.

 

Lime juice (for rusty knife blade): Working on a flat surface, sprinkle salt on your steel blade, squeeze a little lime juice onto the blade. Be certain that you do not to apply too much lime juice making the salt to fall off the blade. Let the knife sit for three hours or more (keep away from the reach of children). Scrub the blade to remove any rust. Wipe with a clean cloth and dry. Turn the blade over and repeat same process.

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